The Traits That Make Up the Real Vitruvian Man

If I am continually working hard to improve myself, then what type of person am I striving to become?

Personal development should be a positive process, not a “fixing what’s broken” process.  That is just my opinion, but I find making changes in life happen easier for me when I approach them from a “I want to start doing this or that” versus “I need to stop doing this or that.”  Does that make any sense?

At any rate, here is a list of the traits I believe make the real “Vitruvian” man or woman.   In no particular order:

Kind

Patient

Wise

Slow to speak

Humble

Self-aware

Compassionate

Loving

leonardoEducated

Discriminating

Adaptable

Focused

Committed

Persevering

Good Listener

Slow to anger

Physically fit

Healthy eater

This is basically a free-association list.  What traits would you add to the list?

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21 thoughts on “The Traits That Make Up the Real Vitruvian Man

  1. The part: “Personal development should be a positive process, not a “fixing what’s broken” process.” is great. I can relate to this philosophy. We need to accept ourselves and our improvement and self-development should be based on the assumption that I’m good enough but I can be better.

  2. I have to agree with Marta. Honesty with yourself and with those around you. Too often we try to cover up how we are feeling for the benefit of others. I think it only hurts us more in the end. And I think I would add amhimsa (sanskrit) for the idea of no harm, in thought, word and deed (my very loose translation). And I agree with you in your approach. We can only strive to be better by accepting our faults and moving forward. Changing who I am vs being a better me. Does that make sense?

    1. I like the idea of adding ahimsa. I am very familiar with the concept from my studies of Hinduism and Buddhism. It is a very noble concept and one I use often when arguing in the favor of all humans committing to a life of charity.

  3. I enjoyed your views on this. I would add: strong, independent and whatever word would fit for “not afraid to ask for help.” Such contrast sure can be found in our “perfect” selves. Thank you for the focus inward. 🙂

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