68 thoughts on “Question of the Day – 9/26/16

  1. It’s not just race it’s murder,rape,terrorism, innocent children being hurt/killed. Gangs having illegal guns, teenagers doing drugs and alcohol ODing on heroin pot OTC drugs and pain killers. This world is scary, we need to stick together. While all this is happening in the USA don’t forget we’ve soldiers fighting for our country men/woman white/black.

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      • I couldn’t agree more. That’s my point exactly. We are all the same, we are all in this together. There shouldn’t be any devisiveness between races, religions, or party lines. Live and let live, regardless of “differences”. That goes for equal pay for equal work, no discriminatory housing/employment, the right to vote and be heard. Equal footing, for all of us. Why is that so difficult to comprehend and ascribe to? I’ll never understand bigotry, prejudice, repression, or flat out anger based solely on ones race or religious beliefs or sex. Unfortunately, though, the US is far from the only place in the world this nonsense persists. And it’s been going on for thousands of years now. We humans think we’re so smart, yet we can’t figure out the biggest social virus to plague mankind.

        Liked by 3 people

  2. Have to start by saying I am not in the US so only going by media accounts for my opinion. I think it is sad first. Very sad. There is a huge division there not only between race but also economically. There also are still those that think there is nothing they can do. By setting examples of showing compassion and kindness, that is something small you can do in your lives which in turn will not only pass along to others but also shows children that to continue this way is just wrong. I hope there can be some healing there. There are some really great people in the US but they are overshadowed by those who are spreading the hate rhetoric.

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  3. I think this is plainly wanted for political agenda. the situation is ferocious, gangs, guns, insecurity, madness…. They want to make us believe we are weak and that we cannot live with one another. The truth is… the contrary. But yet, we are living a total LIe.

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  4. It’s horrible. This whole thing is just separating us as people more and more. How hard is it to simply treat each other like human beings and with respect.

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  5. My personal experience is that young people are growing up in a more and more integrated and diverse environment. They seem to be learning that different doesn’t mean better or worse. Course that may be cause I’m from the north where there is generally speaking less racism.

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      • It must just be the smaller towns in the mid-west. I’m sure Cleveland is different and it’s only about an hour away. I’ve always been exposed to diversity and what I’ve noticed is that if you’re just sincere and honest, people respect that.

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  6. I seriously struggle to understand how it can still happen. Have we really not evolved at all? Why do we not realize that the color of our skin, our religion, our gender, our sexuality has nothing to do with who we are as a person? Why do we not finally see what it’s all about: The person itself. The character, the personality. We are all the same race! We are all human. No wonder Aliens don’t want to get in touch with us. We are plane stupid πŸ˜‰

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  7. I would say that, except for the “Black Community” and their enablers, there is no race issue in America. There’s a cultural issue that is presented by our nation’s domestic enemies as being racial.

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    • That all sounds great, but I would highly recommend you spend some time with people of color. There is one simple fact in America…if you are of color you are treated differently. In stores, at restaurants, by govt officials, by business owners. The list goes on and on.

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      • Immaterial to my point. The way “people of color” are treated is based upon their culture and the fact that it’s not compatible with normative American culture, not because of some gross physical characteristics…though I’ll admit that there is the expectation that they’ll be part of that culture, at least when first encountered.

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  8. Although I do not currently live in the USA, I did grow up there and spent a crucial part of my life the United States, so I became familiar with the old issue of race and racism, and it’s obvious there’s a problem now as ever before.
    I believe the problem has mostly to do with labels. Everyone is too concerned with people being labeled as white, black, Latino, Asian, whatever. There’s always a little race box that you have to check when filling out certain forms. Why? What does it matter what color your skin is? Why do you need to label yourself as a color at all? In fact, even the term “people of color” sounds strange to me. What do you mean with that? Don’t we all have some sort of color in our skin? And if we do, then why aren’t we all people of color?
    When I was a kid living and growing up in the USA, I was instructed by my teachers and school clerks to check the corresponding race box when filling out a form. And the problem is kids are born with no awareness of race, but they’re taught to put on a color label at a very early age- “We’re black, they’re white.” “We’re latinos, they’re not.” That’s how kids are taught to stick with their tribe, to see others as different from them. And so race issues get passed down from generation to generation.
    But the truth is everybody- black, white, Native American, Latino, Asian, Muslim, gay, lesbian, trans- is simply an American. The only label necessary and the only little box you need to check is the one that says, “American.” Stop thinking that it’s necessary to label yourself with a color. It sounds simple, but it’s a huge and difficult change.

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    • First off, sexual identity is different than the social construct of race (which was invented by white people to describe and separate people that they first met), religious designation is not a label unless it’s asked, and to see color of skin is evident when people use their eyes. What you are saying is rip culture and origin from people so we don’t “see” differences which is ridiculous. We’re not blind. And as far as those little boxes the government was established essentially, not by people of color wanting to know how many people of color are here in the US, so maybe you should ask them?

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      • Of course you’re not blind, but although skin color is clearly visible, it shouldn’t be relevant, just like the size of your nose is clearly visible but it has no importance. Also, culture is not necessarily defined by skin color. There are many diverse cultural elements that used to be exclusive to a certain nationality (not race) ant that are now part of American culture, which is not exclusive of race. That’s another labeling problem. Religion is definitely a label. Many people define themselves by it and see each other as different because of their religion even though they might have the same skin color. Sometimes, religion is confused with race, as in the case of Muslims. And if the little race boxes are part of the old establishment, then the American people have a right to question their existence and maybe even see them banished from all official forms.

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      • Again, all of those forms were not instituted by ANY of those subgroups. “We” do not get to define what is American…. That’s Is the point you are missing. “We” are not in power to define that. So if something isn’t defined accurately or properly that from a viewpoint the minority does not have the luxury of defining themselves. “We” have been defined, we are not the definer and that makes a huge difference. Because we are other than it doesn’t matter if it is correct or exclusive or inclusive. “We” weren’t given that luxury, we are not the entitled. Native Americans did not name themselves Indian or Redskins or any other derogatory name. Black people before their culture was erased didn’t call themselves, negro, or colored. That was a name given and when you realize that is used as a designation to say you aren’t like me, you’ll understand the point I was making.

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      • As I forfeited my chance to become an American citizen a long time ago, I can only have opinions but I have even more questions. Why don’t you get to define what is American? You say you have been defined by others, but isn’t that wrong? Why can’t you define yourselves, independently of race of skin color? And race being the main topic of this post, I have more questions related to it. If words like “colored”, “negro”, “redskin” and so on, are derogatory, why not let those words go? If those were names given to keep people apart, why keep using color to describe each other? Why do Americans keep using words like white, black, red, and brown to describe (and define) themselves and other American citizens? Why would any American citizen choose to be labeled as white, black, brown or “a person of color”? Why aren’t minorities in the luxury of defining themselves? Why aren’t you entitled to that? Shouldn’t you be? Truly, it’s all very confusing to me. But I am sure of one thing- race and skin color are merely physical characteristics that shouldn’t be used to label anyone, much less be a cause of conflict among American people.

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      • Wow. There are realities that exist. I can say that even bringing this topic up fills my email inbox with some of the most evil despicable letters. I’ll leave the accusations up to your imagination. Thanks for sharing the video, I hope others watch.

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      • I’m sorry Danny. You’ve been nothing but a gentleman and unfortunately I can imagine what has been said. And not to be self absorbed but can you imagine what has been said when I’ve marched or when I enter into “another” neighborhood? That thinly veiled dislike, to put it mildly, is so palatable for me. And that’s why I worry about my relatives when I don’t hear from them in 24 hours, everyday because of the atmosphere in the country.

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      • It doesn’t do much for mine either. Especially when I look back into history to see that nothing has changed. Or it has changed, but only on paper but not in action and not in the minds of the people I have to interact with daily.

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      • I honestly don’t view seeing color as a bad thing. I have many friends and we all love each other and at the same time we appreciate that we are different in some ways culturally. We simply don’t treat each other differently because of the color of our skin.

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      • If that is what you got out of the video, I’m sorry but you’ve missed the point. And that’s okay, because all of that is not your reality. We can’t be kumbaya until there is ownership of setting that plan of divide and conquer into motion and true healing can start afterwards. This is not a homogenous country like Japan or Korea where we are all the same. And until those divisions aren’t made on a daily basis, it will remain as it is.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. All cats look grey in the dark and presume that all Americans look grey in the dark too. In my view in order to solve the question of race discrimination the equality of all races should be taught and emphasized in schools to all children from the very early age otherwise it will never end.

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