I Think Those Who Are Easily Offended Need To Laugh More

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I was given invaluable advice by Dr. St. Clair while working for my degree in Religious History at UNC Charlotte: “Do not view myth as right or wrong, but in how it shapes a person or group’s worldview. If you take this approach you will be able to listen to someone’s beliefs, appreciate and develop a better understanding of them.”

I have practiced this faithfully throughout my life which is why I have a diverse group of friends. I have worked to be accepting of straight, gay, black, white, Asian, Muslim, Atheist, Christian, intelligent, ignorant, drunk, sober, users, Republican, Democrat, etc. This approach has put me at the edge of many arguments, watching friends do conversational battle over one topic or another, trying to convince the other to convert their belief system or pointing out how each are wrong.  Eventually someone gets their feelings hurt or gets offended.  

I get caught up arguing sometimes, but then pause and ask myself if I am debating or learning; arguing or listening.  There is a difference.  I am not easily offended because I try to refrain from getting defensive and I don’t take myself too seriously.  I think those who are easily offended need to laugh more.  

23 thoughts on “I Think Those Who Are Easily Offended Need To Laugh More

  1. This is great insight. I try to live in a non-judgmental way, take on those teachable moments, and have a good (although sometimes dark) sense of humor. I’ve got to be honest, sometimes those teachable moments can be pretty testy! I cant seem to keep my mouth shut when it comes to certain topics.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Danny,
    That is a great post. As someone who was embarrassed today at work, I think I didn’t show emotion either on my face or by words but was deeply hurt inside- the hurt is still there (at 2 am in my place). But you are right, we need to not take ourselves so seriously- in the grand scheme of things, we are even smaller than an atom. We have no call to judge or offend others and no call to be offended too.
    Thanks for the post !
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

  3. One of my closest friends is on the opposite end of the spectrum politically. We have agreed that (although each knows the other one is clearly wrong) we both have the right to have our own principles. Not getting offended is the best way to live. And it saves a lot of relationships!

    Liked by 2 people

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