Let Me Ask You A Question – 6/7/17

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This morning I talked about why I hate politics.  Without turning this into a disaster, Let me ask you a question…

Do you talk about politics openly or do you avoid the topic all-together?  

45 thoughts on “Let Me Ask You A Question – 6/7/17

  1. I tend to avoid talking politics unless I have some idea what the other person’s position is. I avoid the subject entirely with store clerks and such folk whose jobs require them to try to be pleasant with everyone. It would put them in an awkward position. I have occasionally written on political subjects on my blog.

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  2. I avoid like the plague! Everyone is entitled to their opinion but all to often with politics, people feel they need to force their opinions (views) on someone else. Just because I have an opinion or a certain view, does not mean I have to speak it.

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  3. I generally avoid it, but will speak my mind if provoked, or if I agree with someone’s post here on WP. Do I argue or attempt to change someone’s way of thinking on the matter? Nope. That’s an exercise in futility and frustration.

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  4. I usually avoid it. The reason why is there are so many variables and opinions that it’s hard to have an honest and calm conversation! Even among people that are of the same political leanings, there’s just so much untruth out there, it’s really hard to have an opinion.

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  5. It effects my life too much to ignore, I understand why some people ignore or avoid it but I don’t have that privilege. Falling asleep and handing over my “power or authority” got me here and if something I say or post helps someone to avoid being apathetic to politics and how much being an informed constituent can benefit them, then I’m good. I’ve gone through phases of not being informed, but the environment that I am in doesn’t allow really allow that. To each his own.

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    • Trudy, you bring up good points. I consider myself informed, but I refuse to wrap my life up in politics. The issue I have with most is they talk about politics and complain, but they don’t put any action behind their words. They only complain.

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      • I understand that as well. But there a times when you don’t know what to do but complain because the issues are so depressing. If you aren’t “middle class”, male, white, insured or Christian or come from a country that is, the realities are totally different, life is totally different. I still am not paid equally, I still don’t get to decide what happens to my body even though I’m taxed the same, I am still in threat of laws being passed that make it almost impossible to vote. I am still under threat of losing my health coverage, I am still going missing by the hundreds everyday, I am still under threat of having family deported to a country with no possibility of feeding them, I am still suffering from police violence and three hundred times more likely to be killed by police. I am still three times more likely to unemployed just by the way I look, or who I love, and not by my resume. And that’s all outside of the incompetence of the current administration. Those are a lot of things so I understand the complaining to an extent, especially when on the other hand people says how wonderful it is in this country with no idea what the opposite side of the coin is for almost half of the population, because if I’m fine then that’s all that matters. And that is the sad part. No country can rise higher than its women or the next generation and we are in a lot of shit right now from my perspective.

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      • Or you can look at it like this…there is not another country in the world that affords its citizens more opportunity than the United States of America. I know a lady who immigrated here from Africa who has started an incredibly successful chain of nail salons. Non-white, immigrant, female, little English, non-middle class. When I asked her about all the challenges she laughed. She said Americans are spoiled and complain like babies.

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      • I’m not saying it’s the worst country in the world, but it definitely isn’t the best and it isn’t the country it was even thirty years ago falling more and more into third world status for some of its citizens. I am speaking politics not opportunities. There are worse, but that doesn’t mean that I ignore the inequalities by law, living here and decide that everything is great to be treated as a second class citizen where a country decides to treat more than half of its citizens like crap and act like everything is wonderful. Otherwise this country wouldn’t exist and you’d be bowing to the Queen of England. That doesn’t make me feel safer when my health care is being threatened, that doesn’t help the Veterans who go undiagnosed with mental problems and are homeless, that doesn’t make me less worried about my mother because with the new budget her Medicare will be cut, that doesn’t make my neighborhood safer because she comes from a country where it is unstable. And it doesn’t make me spoiled to want better than my parents because that’s exactly what they want for me not to have the conditions that they left their country for (dictatorship and poverty). And Africa is a continent, so for her story there are others in other countries there that don’t agree. That’s why some choose to emigrate to Europe and Canada instead of here, with better quality lives. Just because she has a limited experience doesn’t make her right, it just means she has an opinion like everyone else. It doesn’t invalidate mine, it just makes her an exception, and it doesn’t speak for millions that go to bed hungry, homeless, sick and those on the brink .

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      • I guess. Obviously my experience is different than others. And I am also sick of hearing so many people complain. I’m not a complainer by nature so that might have something to do with it also.

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      • Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but discourse, civil disobedience, protest and dissent are what this country is built on , and what makes this country American, also some of the few rights that aren’t being legislated away.

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      • That is not bad news. But civil disobedience requires action or else it is simply complaining; and the vast majority just complain. Social media champions abound resulting in a hollow voice.

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  6. As I noted is another quesiton, I am using a pseudonym. I do most of my talking about politics hiding behind it. Now, when I’m not hiding, it is usually only with specific people that I know and mostly in response to something they shared. When I share something on Facebook, I use a friend list to share it with only those people.

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  7. I usually avoid commenting, but I think that everybody is entitled to their own opinion. Sometimes the problem can be that people are too strong about the subject and tend to convince you in their own way of thinking.

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  8. I’m not afraid to voice my opinion. In fact I wouldn’t stand for less—ever since Trump was elected I’ve wanted to speak out against his policies and stop sitting around and doing nothing. I’m even starting a blog for that purpose. But in person—excluding activism in the internet—I much prefer to stay silent. I’m stronger through words than I am with my literal voice.

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      • Oh, pretty much everything he says, but mostly his plans to not do a thing about global warming. And I think that pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord is the most stupid and most detrimental decision made since Andrew Jackson’s mistakes. There are other issues I could rail on about but I’m not informed enough to raise a good argument, so I’ll refrain. Basically I’m as Democrat as they come, but NOT radical or far left (oh god save me from the extremes, stop this divisive chaos in our country…).

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      • I believe the media is out on a mission to sensationalize anything. The US will not pull out of the Paris agreement. I think everyone needs to relax. lol I refuse to believe anything the media says.

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      • I just typed out a very long reply and then realized my argument punched holes through itself. Not the strongest argument, lol. I think the most intelligent and informed thing I can say at this point is “We’ll see.” The future will, after all, tell a more precise tale than the media. I agree with you there.

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  9. It depends on who I am in the company of. Unless it’s a very close friend, I will avoid it at all costs. It has been tough to do at work. I work in the finance industry. There is this one person (who I work for in a way) at my office whose political views are total opposite of mine. Since the election he has associated me with extreme far-left liberals (I am a democrat/liberal, just not extreme). This person often tries to provoke me. There was only one time I broke down. He said something truly terrible, and before I knew it I was on my feet, out of my chair, voiced raised. The shock on his face was something I will never forget.

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  10. It depends on the audience. At work, it’s not proper to do so, but many do anyway. In my private life, with my family, I talk about it openly. We don’t all agree. My brother, an ex-marine and Vietnam era vet, leans one way. I lean the other. He talks about how it will be great having a strong military and I remind him that it will be led by a President who is a four-time Vietnam draft dodger. He doesn’t like that reminder and it makes for some fun discussions. This political climate has been very polarizing. On social media, because I’m an author who frankly doesn’t care about the political leanings of my readers, I avoid weighing in for the most part. It’s only when I see blatantly false news items that I feel compelled to set people straight and ask them to check their sources on both sides of the aisle.

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  11. As with many things, I think there’s an important balance to strike. I think it’s important to talk about it openly – many times this allows discussions and ideas to flourish – but I still reserve judgement on who I should do that with. Given the current political milieu in the UK and USA, oftentimes it seems better to not start a discussion about politics, people get heated up very quickly!

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  12. It depends who I’m speaking with. I’m very opinionated, so if the person is a stranger, or a colleague I usually just smiled and nod. I’m more open with friends and family (and people in bars). In 2016 I was supporting Clinton and my fiance’ was supporting Trump – our engagement almost didn’t survive the election!!!

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  13. I don’t mind speaking about politics when the subject naturally comes up in conversation. Someone is always making a joke about Trump or bringing up something in the news that creates an opportunity to discuss. Usually, I like to talk about the hope we have in the future as outlined in the Bible. I’m politically neutral so sharing the message of God’s Kingdom is a lot more uplifting than talking about how terrible things are right now.

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    • What frustrates me the most is people who pretend to know about politics, yet they really have no idea. They feel like politics is important to talk about, but have zero knowledge.

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  14. People who share my views, easy. People who disagree, depends on who I’m with. With some, it’s fun and instructive to engage in some adversarial repartee. For others, not so much. Same with workplaces. Case by case.

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  15. The determining factor (especially since I am 20), is with which “age group of people I talk to”. I attend a lot of debates and have judged quite a few revolving around domestic and international politics, so it is pretty easy for me to talk about politics as I have done my homework.

    You go onto the streets of my city and literally everyone talks about politics, yet at the same time people get lynched for stupid reasons (a 16 y/o boy was lynched by a mob because someone told that he has beef ). If I talk to strangers in tea stalls about domestic policies and our views differ, some of them (after a point) give me an earful of bullshit like- “You are still a kid. You do not know the intricacies of politics.” or they say something that is REALLY improbable. At such points, I just stop talking (you can only take a donkey to the pond but you cant force it to drink can you?)

    Talking over it on Facebook is the most entertaining because you get to see the magnification of indifference and stupidity (ironically alongside well-being of the state, people, and community). But in my case, this differs case to case.

    However, the general idea in India is to be VERY careful of what you talk online because it is such a diverse nation and if you offend someone or talk with an ignorant person, wave goodbye to all decency you know.

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    • I think I would talk more openly if the situations were less like what you’ve described. The U.S. mirrors much of what you have described. I guess it doesn’t matter where you go in this world, politics always evokes the same type reaction.

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