Here Are 10 Things I Stopped Doing That Made Me Happier

Danny's iphone 022A few years back I made some drastic changes.  In 2013 I decided enough-was-enough and I went through a revolution of my mind and habits.  Here are a few of the things that I stopped doing which made me a happier person:

  1. I stopped blaming others for my underachieving.
  2. I stopped complaining
  3. I stopped comparing myself to others
  4. I stopped trying to be right all the time
  5. I stopped talking to myself like I was a villain
  6. I stopped allowing myself to make excuses
  7. I stopped watching television
  8. I stopped allowing my mind to be limited
  9. I stopped wishing for change
  10. I stopped waiting on life to happen for me

43 thoughts on “Here Are 10 Things I Stopped Doing That Made Me Happier

  1. Pingback: Let Me Ask You A Question – 7/11/17 | Dream Big, Dream Often

    • It’s not that hard. I choose success over television. It is easily the most unproductive, brain-numbing activity ever perpetrated on humanity. Now, I’ll read or find other things to consume my time. 🙂

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  2. I kinda of like #4 “I stopped trying to be right all the time”- that will be a hard one to give up- LOL!
    Have you expanded on #7 in any other posts? I’d be very curious as to your reasons….I’ve been giving up TV little by little and find peace and productivity- but haven’t given it completely yet…

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  3. Working on all of these, think the worse thing is number 3 and 5 for me. I always compare myself to the old me before MS, which feels like comparing myself to some one else, but need to stop this as it’s wasting valuable time!!!! Thanks for this thoughtful post!!!!!

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    • I experience #3 any time I play golf. MS has taken away from my abilities, but I remember the golfer who once existed and compare myself now to the person that existed back then. It’s tough! lol

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Reblogged this on Annas Art – FärgaregårdsAnna and commented:
    Great advice from Danny! I actually did the same in some way and I don’t regret the change one little bit. It’s a work in progress that started long time ago for me. I’m a slow thinker and doer sometimes 😉
    Comments disabled here. Please visit original post for leaving comments and read more on Dannys blog/Anna

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Pingback: Here Are 10 Things I Stopped Doing That Made Me Happier – ENLIGHTENMENT ANGELS

  6. Pingback: Here Are 10 Things I Stopped Doing That Made Me Happier | Dream Big, Dream Often – My Corner on the Internet

    • I was a miserable person several years ago so I speak from experience. And I used the “easier” excuse for almost 2 years till I took responsibility for my own happiness and took action. I never said it was easy, but it is definitely doable. 🙂
      Danny

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      • I am sure it’s doable, but I don’t think many people would be able to do any of that without (professional) help.

        I wanna look more closely at some of the points in this list I might have misunderstood:

        I stopped comparing myself to others.
        – I would like to know how you achieved that. I think that many people constantly compare themselves to others. I know I do, although I try not to. And I feel happier since I stopped caring too much about others. However, I don’t believe you can ever completely stop social comparison unless you’re a monk in a Buddhist temple.

        I stopped allowing myself to make excuses.
        – So what else did you do? Try to be ‘better’? Be honest about failures? Push yourself further?

        I stopped watching television.
        – Smart one! Stopped TV a long time ago. (Although I still love to watch series online without being brainwashed by crappy distractions on TV).

        I stopped wishing for change.
        – Isn’t this kind of the same thing as stopping to dream…?

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      • This is quite the list. I think I’m going to write a post about it. But on your last point about wishing…Wishing for change has nothing to do with dreaming. Wishing for change is hoping for something or somebody to do something for me that I should be doing for myself. Dreaming, in my world, is having vision and seeing things happen before they actually happen. Wishing is hoping but leaving yourself up to the ebbs and flows of life. I don’t leave anything up to a wish, I get out and work hard at my plan and achieve.

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      • To your first bullet point, I worked to be the person others compare themselves to. I don’t mean to over simplify but the honest answer is I started looking inward and stopped looking outward.

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      • And on the excuse point…I made a list of all the “reasons” I used in my life professionally and personally and did some serious soul searching. My goal was to identify if they were truly reasons or if I was making excuses; and the 2 are very different. I came up with 1 question to determine if I was making excuses for failures/shortcomings: “Am I giving my absolute, complete 100% effort?” If I can honestly say yes then the outcome is the outcome. If I say no, then I have to re-evaluate my plan and efforts.

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      • Thank you for your answers.. I can’t shake the feeling that this way of thinking is very focused on success and career goals. It seems like a way to define yourself via the things you’ve achieved in life rather than the person you are. But I guess this is not a ‘life view’ and rather a ‘career view’.

        Btw, the first concept you describe sounds like the psychological concept perceived self-efficacy which is a valid predictor of academic/professional success.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you for your answers.. I can’t shake the feeling that this way of thinking is very focused on success and career goals. It seems like a way to define yourself via the things you’ve achieved in life rather than the person you are. But I guess this is not a ‘life view’ and rather a ‘career view’.

    Btw, the first concept you describe sounds like the psychological concept perceived self-efficacy which is a valid predictor of academic/professional success.

    Liked by 1 person

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