Let Me Ask You a Question – 12/8/18

Truven Health Analytics conducted a poll in which 75% of Americans stated they believe they eat healthy.  So why is obesity at near epidemic proportions?

32 thoughts on “Let Me Ask You a Question – 12/8/18

    • Possibly, but it doesn’t take much looking to see obesity is overtaking the United States. And yet most people who would answer my question in this forum would probably say they eat healthy. Maybe some do, maybe some don’t. I don’t see much healthy eating going on around me.

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      • Of course you could eat healthy but too much, I visited the states in 2000 and I remember the starters were as big as our main courses, I don’t think I ever managed to finish a main course, but the same problem is developing over here, most of my students eat complete crap though.

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      • Our portions are insane and our restaurants do not serve a lot of veggies. It is common for dinner plates to exceed 1200-1500 calories for that single meal. It doesn’t take long to do the caloric math.

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  1. Do those responding to the surveys actually know what constitutes a healthy diet? Do people who know they eat a very unhealthy diet respond to the survey, or avoid it? And, how were the people to be surveyed selected or contacted (Was it random and representative of the whole population?).

    Fat-making food is so heavily marketed and often less expensive and more convenient than healthy food, that it is no surprise so many are obese, and get that way very young.

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    • All of those scientific questions would obviously have to be put to Truven Analytics as I did not go in depth into their criteria, although if you are interested it is published as a part of their findings. With all of that said, I believe it comes down to education in regards to what is truly healthy and what is not as you mentioned in the first part of your comment. I know people who eat McDonald’s and truly believe it isn’t as bad if you drink a diet cola. Now to you and I we might realize how ludicrous the statement is well before it would ever come from our mouth, but not all people have the same level of understanding or knowledge. I also believe your last part about the marketing has a huge impact. McDonald’s makes it cheaper to buy from their Dollar menu than going to the store and they market that to people who don’t have as much money.

      There is a real marketing focus on people of poorer means by cigarette companies, alcohol companies, high interest loan companies, lotteries and fast food restaurants. Not to carry on-and-on, but in my view education plays a major role in obesity. And of course I’m not referring to people who deal with legitimate health issues. DR

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      • For example, according to various healthy weight and BMI indexes, a man my age and height should weigh 160 pounds. I would look like a bloody skeleton! And the BMI calculator tells me I am in the “obese” category. Let me assure you I’m not. I o to the gym 2-3 times a week, take long walks, eat healthy (though not obsessively), and am in the best shape of my life, yet according to the “science” I need to lose about 45 pounds! Nonsense.

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      • I guess it comes down to how we as a society define “healthy”. And I don’t say that to be argumentative at all. The counter argument to your statement would be to gather data as to how many people who might be classified as “obese” are actually healthy versus those who are not. That study would probably be quite revealing.

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    • Jim, now you have spoken the truth. Most people simply do not eat healthy. The average American eats fewer than 2 servings of vegetables per week. lol

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  2. Suspicious me says surveys are flawed and numbers can be manipulated to show what the researchers are trying to prove.

    But I also know that weight is not always an indicator of good health. So much more to health than numbers on a scale.

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    • But obesity has nothing to do with weight, by its definition. And I don’t think it takes much looking around at people to realize something is going on. Especially when you begin to compare how people look these days with crazy increases in heart disease, cancer, strokes. I am not a doctor, but I can look around me and see people wheezing walking around the mall or up stairs. I can see people struggling to do common daily things like walk to their car without losing their breath.

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    • The angle of “weight” and obesity is exactly why I did not include the word “weight” in my question. Someone can be a larger person and be healthy.

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    • Funny you would mention this because Evelin’s and I ate at a restaurant today for lunch. Every menu item had caloric values listed and almost every menu item was over 1200 calories! For 1 meal. I would not be shocked if some people consume 3000+ calories each day.

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      • I tend to disagree on the moderation argument because that muddles the pool even more. Now we have to define moderation. lol I think there can be a formula for most people. I think it is an education/knowledge issue. I know people who don’t believe soda/pop/cola is bad for you. I know people who don’t believe that McDonald’s is really that bad as long as you mix in a diet soda.

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      • I think there has to be a degree of common sense involved certainly. The odd McDonald’s every now and again isn’t going to hurt, unless of course you are eating at burger king every other day.
        I do think a lot of our attitude towards food and diet comes from our parents.

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  3. Probably because everyone has their own idea of what’s healthy. Vegan, salt free, sugar free, gluten free, carb free, fat free, etc. Ask ten people and you’ll get ten different answers. I think moderation in all things is the wisest choice. I was on a 300 calorie a day restricted diet and I lost 30 pounds in nine weeks. I had to get the flu the eighth week in order to reach the thirty pound goal. That is not good.

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    • I am not sure I buy “all things in moderation”. How do you define moderation? I don’t know the answer, but it seems that trying to define “health” is like trying to grab a greased watermelon in the pool. lol

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